Private Property Impound Towing 
Business, Retail Strip Malls, Covered Garages, Shopping Malls

There is NO FEE CHARGE to the requesting person for the removal of a car blocking your driveway in your private property. All towing fees are paid by the vehicle owner. 

​Private Property Impound Towing  Business, Retail Strip Malls, Covered Garages, Shopping Malls

If you've ever had your vehicle towed from private property, you may be wondering what private property impound towing is. Essentially, private property impound towing is when a vehicle is towed from private property at the request of the property owner. This can happen for a variety of reasons, such as if the vehicle is blocking a driveway or fire hydrant, or if it's been abandoned on the property. In most cases, the vehicle will be towed to a nearby impound lot, where it can be reclaimed by the owner for a fee.

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What to do if I have a car towed off my property?

If you've had a vehicle towed from private property, you may be wondering what to do next. First, it's important to understand your rights and the laws surrounding private property impound towing. Once you know where you stand, you can begin the process of getting your vehicle back.

 

Most states have laws that protect motorists from unreasonable or unlawful towing practices. For example, in some states tow truck operators must post signs informing drivers that they are entering a private property impound zone. In other states, private property owners must give motorists a grace period of 24 hours before their vehicles can be towed.

 

Knowing your rights is the first step in getting your vehicle back after it has been towed from private property. The next step is to contact the tow truck company that impounded your vehicle. You will need to provide them with your personal information and vehicle information, such as the make and model of your car. The tow truck company will then give you a release form to sign, which will authorize them to release your vehicle to you.

 

Once you have signed the release form, you will need to pay a fee to the tow truck company in order to retrieve your vehicle. The fee will vary depending on the company, but it is typically around $100. After you have paid the fee, the tow truck company will give you the keys to your vehicle and you will be able to drive it off of the private property.

 

If you feel that you were unlawfully towed from private property, you may be able to file a complaint with your state's consumer protection agency. You can also contact an attorney who specializes in private property impound towing cases. An attorney can help you determine if you have a case and can represent you in court, if necessary.

 

Private property impound towing can be a stressful and frustrating experience. However, by knowing your rights and taking the proper steps, you can get your vehicle back and move on with your day.

How does private property towing work?

​Private Property Impound Towing  Business, Retail Strip Malls, Covered Garages, Shopping Malls

If you've ever had your car towed from private property, you know it can be a frustrating and costly experience. But how does private property towing actually work?

 

In most cases, private property towing is handled by a towing company that has been contracted by the property owner. The towing company will typically have signs posted around the property that state their policy for towing unauthorized vehicles.

 

If your vehicle is towed from private property, the towing company will usually charge a fee for the tow and impoundment of your vehicle. The fees can vary depending on the company, but they are typically around $200 or more.

 

You will need to contact the towing company in order to arrange for the release of your vehicle. The company will usually require you to pay the tow and impound fees before they will release your car.

 

If you feel that your vehicle was towed unfairly or without proper notice, you can contact your local Better Business Bureau or consumer protection agency. You may also want to consult with an attorney to discuss your legal options.